Residential Architecture Tour: San Francisco, Part 1

By November 5, 2013Building Our Practice

Last month we attended a residential architecture tour as part of Reinvention 2013 in San Francisco.  I appreciated the different types of projects on the tour, ranging from high-end and high-detail to experimental and unconventional.  Perhaps what I found most interesting in these projects were the elements of sustainability.  The architects created amazing spaces working within small square footages, and in some cases on small budgets.  Some projects achieved LEED Platinum certification while others aimed for Passive House and Net-Zero Energy.  Each of the projects was successful and unique, and I left the conference with a renewed commitment to the process of design and sustainable architecture.

 

 

The Butterfly House | Russian Hill, San Francisco, CA

Architect: John Maniscalco

I was struck by the indoor-outdoor relationships of this house.  The architecture connected both to private spaces on the lower level and to views of San Francisco above.

 

Above: An entire wall of the lower level opens to a private, landscaped courtyard.

Above: A corner of the upper level living space opens to views of the neighborhood.

Above: A rooftop terrace provides spaces to enjoy views of the city and the bay area.

Beaver Street Reprise | Castro District, San Francisco, CA

Craig Steely Architecture

I appreciated the simplicity and straightforward approach of this residence.  The detailing was simple and spaces felt warm and inviting.  The rooftop terrace was comfortable and it felt like an extension of the interior living space.

Above: A wood-clad facade harmonizes with the surrounding traditional architecture.

Above: An upper level kitchen and living area open to a terrace.

Above: The upper level terrace with planters and fireplace provides sun and great views of the city.

Above: A well-lit studio space

Above:  A wood stair with glass guardrail

Mission House | Mission District, San Francisco, CA

Architect: INTERSTICE Architects

 

Above: A wall of re-purposed glass window units creates an interesting texture on the front facade.