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The Granary Campus Salt Lake is an adaptive reuse project composed of five connected historic warehouse buildings in an underserved
area of Salt Lake City, Utah.
Once a center for manufacturing and industry with rail-supported warehousing and storage, the area known as the Warehouse District fell into decline in the 1950s as the automobile displaced rail service.
In 2018, Lake Union Partners, a Seattle-based development team, and outdoor retail visionary Bryce Phillips, founder of evo, launched an idea for creating a campus–a ‘base camp’–to bring together outdoor enthusiasts along the Wasatch Front.
“We wanted to leave all of that character exposed so you could see the building had seen 120 years of use. The new design elements were intended to contrast that, not replicate it."
— OWNER NEWTON BREITER
Stucco facades, interior brick walls, and exposed wood/steel roof structures were carefully preserved, playing an integral role in how new spaces came together.
The design team evaluated the conditions and envisioned a central spine to connect all five structures into one functioning system, allowing access to each space in the campus: the hotel lobby, skatepark, two retail stores, bouldering gym, and a rooftop bar.
The vision of the owners and design team to create a community hub that reflects the gritty but authentic culture and artistic expression of the makers, fabricators, craftspeople, and artists of the Granary District was a guiding principle of the design.
The high historic warehouse ceiling height allowed for the insertion of an upper level mezzanine within the timber rafters with ingenious connections to all four fingers of the 50 evo Hotel guest rooms.
After a long day out skiing in the mountains, a cozy Rafter Room provides a nurturing space to rest and relax.
The Salt Lake Bouldering Project houses 26,000 square feet of climbing terrain with an exposed wood & steel roof structure. Guests of evo hotel as well as local Utahns connect here through rigorous climbs.
"Even though you're miles from an actual ski resort, this is an intentionally focused community. You really feel like you have something in common with the people you're sharing the space with."
— ASSOCIATE AARON DAY
Nestled beneath skylights and an exposed wooden ceiling, a dedicated boot fitting area invites snowboarders and skiers to test gear in comfortable seating.
The team discovered old rail beds on the floors of the buildings and repurposed them into the on-site indoor skatepark.
At 5,000 square feet, The All Together Skatepark is designed to help all levels of skaters improve their skills. It features quarter pipes, a half pipe, ledges and more made of wood and weather-resistant Skatelite.
"The Granary Campus is a true gift to the state of Utah. This building will help to revive its own neighborhood— a long ignored corner of Salt Lake City. More importantly, however, the Granary Campus offers Utah's developers and architects an example of how to use historic buildings as economic and cultural catalysts that transform the neighborhoods and communities in which they stand. I wholeheartedly applaud Lloyd Architects for the creativity through which they approved the Granary Campus and thank them for providing our state with a seminal standard of adaptive reuse."
— UTAH DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIAN DAVID AmOTT
If you want to learn more about the Granary Campus, including the story behind the project, site and historic constraints, use of Archicad and LiDAR to scan the existing site and much more, watch the free webinar hosted by Graphisoft.
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The homeowners had a vision: craft a space that would connect with the land and the rich history all around it, blending in with the setting and the surroundings. Yet with custom design and materials that would also allow it to stand out.
Impeccable exterior and interior details create a modern aesthetic without sacrificing comfort. A palette of sustainable materials contributes to this aesthetic: mortar-washed horizontal Norman brick, clear VG Fir rain screen siding and cedar shingle roofing.
A combination of bright, well-lit spaces and dark, moody rooms orient around the courtyard.
Three simple gables welcome you upon arrival, a nod to traditional structures that dot the neighborhood.
The kitchen and common areas orient to the north, reflective of how the original home was situated.
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It’s a small coffee roaster with huge ideas. And an even bigger heart. So together with the owner, we crafted a new place that could house all the goodness.
It began by looking at the space a little differently with Campos founder Will Young and co-owner Damian Roche. It’s how we always begin, by seeing and hearing a vision of what we’re starting with and thinking about where a project could go, all through the eyes of our clients.
The project started with identifying a place that had a strong sense of local character and community: a downtown alley well known for its design agencies, a record shop and nearby art venues.
— DESIGNER Won Shim
Several upgrades were needed on the space, including new concrete slabs, timber support beams, roofing and HVAC systems.
We preserve historical details whenever possible. This project on Edison Street, an urban Salt Lake City alleyway, included exposing (and reinforcing) brick walls, wooden ceiling beams and other intriguing details.
An animated daylight study showed how installing a skylight—as well as windows along the entire front side—would let natural light wash through the whole space in every season.
The finished windows create opportunities for inspiring indoor-outdoor interactions.
We reused existing materials wherever possible to connect guests to the history of the building.
The roasting process and equipment were kept visible to the public to create common areas and spaces that inspire community.
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The intent was clear: Build a barn on a farm that had been in the family for generations to create a legacy place for community and kin. Snuck Farm came out of a simple desire to preserve heritage and promote a simple idea: Eat well. Do good.
Page wanted a modest, manageable farm for growing things in a sustainable, responsible way. Guy (Page’s father) was thinking about how to make it function for all time. It was the ideal pairing.
— Designer Anna Friend
The project started with the barn, spanning nearly the entire width of the plot. The clients’ only demand: a breezeway large enough to accommodate a commercial vehicle.
We leaned on exposed raw materials that could handle the often-harsh Utah weather, including elements like fieldstone walls, exposed beams and concrete-slab flooring.
As we stood on Snuck Farm and looked north at the towering face of Mount Timpanogos, then south to face the distant but impressive Mount Nebo, we realized that the barn could nestle between those two peaks—aligning the pasture to the south with the greenhouse and yard to the north.
— Principal Warren Lloyd
Mountains are perfectly framed in the entrances on either side.
The goal was always to make the barn feel like it had been there for generations and the suburbs had grown up around it. Not the other way around.
The space is now the center of the community, beckoning visitors from all around. The greenhouses allow for indoor growing year-round. The fruits of the farm supply greens to community farmers markets, local restaurants, Community Supported Agriculture subscriptions along the Wasatch Front, self-sufficient gardening, healthy-eating classes, pop-up dinners, and local school sponsorships.
I still drive by and see this place for the first time all over again. Who knows what the future will bring, but it’s already brought us further than we thought we’d go.
— Page, owner
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A space where community could gather, an inclusive space for all. That was the vision right from the start. Missy Greis just needed to bring that vision to life.
It began with a warehouse built in the 1940s, home to a printing company run by a local family.
Our goal was to open the space up as much as possible to create a large gathering hall full of light and interaction.
— Designer Anna Friend
We decided from the beginning that everything we found here that could be reused or repurposed would be. And that we’d bring in whatever else we needed from local sources.
— Principal Warren Lloyd
Strategies regarding materials began by highlighting elements that had existed in the building, then repurposing elements or objects that had existed in another place or locale, and then finally developing elements that could be constructed to connect those components and ideas into a greater whole. We would make design decisions with the same guiding principles of sustainability, local-first and community.
— Designer Anna Friend
The owner’s vision also included having spaces of many shapes and sizes throughout the industrial-modern warehouse. Today, it plays host to gatherings of every kind, including art festivals, award ceremonies, and dream weddings.
The space features a wide-open view of the roastery, letting visitors in on the process of roasting coffee beans.
Repurposed metal-lined fire doors and massive windows were acquired from a nearby warehouse, another reflection of Publik’s commitment to “community over corporate."
Maybe that’s the story: The people of Publik. All people are connected. And Publik is a common ground for everyone.
— Missy, Owner
The original founder’s desk found a home in an upstairs office. His briefcase sits on a shelf in the roastery. It really is all about community.
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In partnership with Tokyo-based design firm Schemata Architects, we set out to craft a simple cabin that would fit nicely into a collection of small, sustainably constructed residences within a preserved mountain ecosystem.
Every detail was carefully thought through and crafted, including sustainable materials used and specific placement of those materials.
The absence of drywall and paint throughout the entire structure enhances the elemental experience.
The living space was carefully arranged around a central atrium with a steel spiral staircase.
Select grade Douglas Fir was carefully installed and framed with no visible pencil marks or waffle stamp of framing hammers. Visible conduit wiring snakes along walls around the cabin. Interior walls are almost entirely finished in ACx plywood. Exterior walls are finished in rigid foam insulation and ACx marine-grade plywood.
Careful landscaping techniques preserved native pine species.
The cabin rises above the hillside on a galvanized steel frame.
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Building From Here is all about what we get to start with. This project started with a large, wide-open space at the base of Mount Timpanogos filled with cottonwood trees and next to a golf course. Beautiful, sprawling land that’s hard to come by in this area. The challenge was, how do you make a place that feels so spacious also feel welcoming? We shared the owners’ same vision: No wasted space, and a purpose for everything.
We created an L-shaped, low-profile home clad in brick and clear cedar for an understated, modern impression. Bold design that was spacious but not too showy.
An open floor plan, including the wide-open kitchen, allows for gathering. We considered multiple circulation patterns based on the expected flow of friends and family moving throughout the home.
The kitchen is the functional heart of the home, and the circulation is organized to comfortably pass through the kitchen from several parts of the house and pool terrace.
— Principal Warren Lloyd
Indoor and outdoor living spaces are carefully blended together through the use of expansive windows and doors.
We wanted the space to feel welcoming, so most of the spaces enjoy natural light throughout the day.
Massive floor-to-ceiling windows fill rooms with breathtaking views of the soaring Mount Timpanogos.
We wanted to create a place to gather where everybody could be in the same space at the same time.
— Stephanie, homeowner
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Building From Here is all about what we get to start with. This project started with a large, wide-open space at the base of Mount Timpanogos filled with cottonwood trees and next to a golf course. Beautiful, sprawling land that’s hard to come by in this area. The challenge was, how do you make a place that feels so spacious also feel welcoming? We shared the owners’ same vision: No wasted space, and a purpose for everything.
We created an L-shaped, low-profile home clad in brick and clear cedar for an understated, modern impression. Bold design that was spacious but not too showy.
An open floor plan, including the wide-open kitchen, allows for gathering. We considered multiple circulation patterns based on the expected flow of friends and family moving throughout the home.
The kitchen is the functional heart of the home, and the circulation is organized to comfortably pass through the kitchen from several parts of the house and pool terrace.
— Principal Warren Lloyd
Indoor and outdoor living spaces are carefully blended together through the use of expansive windows and doors.
We wanted the space to feel welcoming, so most of the spaces enjoy natural light throughout the day.
Massive floor-to-ceiling windows fill rooms with breathtaking views of the soaring Mount Timpanogos.
We wanted to create a place to gather where everybody could be in the same space at the same time.
— Stephanie, homeowner
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